In NBC News: Early human Homo naledi may have made tools, buried dead

Far in the back of a twisty, narrow cave in South Africa lie the remains of three pre-humans with small heads and clever hands. The discovery, and research done on a cave full of 15 skeletons nearby, strongly suggests the hominids were much less ancient than previously thought. It also suggests that they may not only have lived alongside more modern humans, but buried their dead and, perhaps, made and used tools.

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In The Washington Post: Humanity’s strange new cousin is shockingly young — and shaking up our family tree

Homo naledi, a strange new species of human cousin found in South Africa two years ago, was unlike anything scientists had ever seen. Some aspects seemed modern, almost human. But their brains were as small as a gorilla's, suggesting Homo naledi was incredibly primitive. The species was an enigma.

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South African cave yields yet more fossils of a newfound relative

Probing deeper into the South African cave system known as Rising Star, a subterranean maze that last year yielded the largest cache of hominin fossils known to science, an international team of researchers has discovered another chamber with more remains of a newfound human relative, Homo naledi

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In National Geographic: Did This Mysterious Ape-Human Once Live Alongside Our Ancestors?

A year and a half after adding a puzzling new member to the human family tree, a team of researchers working in South Africa have offered an additional twist: the species is far younger than its bizarrely primitive body would suggest, and may have shared the landscape with early Homo sapiens.

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In The Conversation: More secrets of human ancestry emerge from South African caves

It’s been a year and a half since scientists announced that a new hominin species, which they called Homo naledi, had been discovered in the Rising Star Cave outside Johannesburg. Now they say they have established and published the age of the original naledi fossils that garnered global headlines in 2015. Homo naledi lived sometime between 335 and 236 thousand years ago, making it relatively young.

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In BBC News: Amazing haul of ancient human finds unveiled

A new haul of ancient human remains has been described from an important cave site in South Africa. The finds, including a well-preserved skull, bolster the idea that the Homo naledi people deliberately deposited their dead in the cave.

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In Wisconsin Public Radio: UW Professor Helps Find More Hominin Fossils Deep In South Africa Cave

A team of scientists from around the world led by a University of Wisconsin-Madison professor has found a second chamber with fossils of a species related to humans, Homo naledi. Now, a team including UW-Madison anthropology professor John Hawks has found more remains of the previously unknown species in a second chamber.

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In The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Ancient humans, newly discovered species roamed Earth at the same time, UW researcher discovers

When bones of a new human species were found deep in a South Africa cave a few years ago, they looked 2 million years old. But scientists recently made a startling discovery — the bones were much younger, between 226,000 and 335,000 years old. That means the newly found species, dubbed Homo naledi, roamed the landscape at the same time as ancient humans.

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In The Daily Mail: Humanity's mystery new cousin is surprisingly young

Deep within the Rising Star Cave system in South Africa, archaeologists have discovered the remains of at least three Hominin naledi. The age of the remains has been revealed to be startlingly young, suggesting the species was alive sometime between 335,000 and 236,000 years ago.

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