In The Atlantic: Will Starbucks' implicit bias training work?

One training, developed by Patricia Devine and colleagues at the Prejudice and Intergroup Relations Lab at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, looks at bias as a habit that can be broken. Their approach consists of a couple of hours of modules based on what the researchers see as three essential elements of an antibias intervention: awareness of the problem, motivation to do something about it, and strategies for what to do.

Read More »

How talking more can make you better at listening — to foreign languages

The typical foreign language class spends much of its time listening to fluent speakers, but new UW research shows that the students should spend more time talking.

Read More »

In the Wall Street Journal: Smiles hide many messages, some of them unfriendly

“Different smiles have different impacts on people’s bodies,” said Jared D. Martin, a doctoral student who led the study in the lab of University of Wisconsin–Madison psychology professor Paula Niedenthal. Along with poker players, psychologists have long known that our facial expressions can betray our emotions. But no one has demonstrated exactly how this works, Mr. Martin said.

Read More »

Here is how a cat can hinder children learning new words

A new study found that familiar objects more interesting to children reduced their ability to learn new words associated with novel objects.

Read More »

Patricia Devine on WAMU 88.5: How to recognize and overcome your biases

Almost every day, there’s at least one story in the news that involves racism, sexism or another kind of bigotry. But when you hear those stories, do you think, “Well, that’s not me”? Turns out, even among the best-intentioned people, unconscious biases can exist. So how can we identify these biases, and is it possible to overcome them?

Read More »

They grin, you bear it: Research reveals the physical impact of a smile

Not all smiles are expressions of warmth and joy. Sometimes they can be downright mean. And our bodies react differently depending on the message a smile is meant to send. Research led by Jared Martin, a psychology graduate student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, shows that smiles meant to convey dominance are associated with a physical reaction - a spike in stress hormones - in their targets. On the other hand, smiles intended as a reward, to reinforce behavior, appear to physically buffer recipients against stress.

Read More »

In Isthmus: Virtual clues: UW researchers study how people interpret VR technology

No matter how real virtual reality might seem, humans don’t view it as reality, UW-Madison researchers find.

Read More »

When the stage is just the start

A background in spoken word and music has served as a powerful launchpad for junior Jamie Dawson.

Read More »

New approaches in neuroscience show it’s not all in your head

Our own unique experiences shape how we view the world and respond to the events in our lives. But experience is highly subjective. What’s distressing or joyful to one person may be very different to another. These differences can matter, especially as a growing body of research shows that what happens in our inner landscapes — our thoughts about and interpretations of our experiences — can have physical consequences in our brains and bodies.

Read More »

L&S Communications

South Hall, Bascom Mall
Madison, WI 53706
info@ls.wisc.edu