L&S winners: Cool Science Images 2018

A panel of eight experienced artists and scientists judged the scientific, aesthetic and creative qualities of 171 images and videos submitted by UW–Madison faculty, staff and students — a record number of entries for the eighth annual competition.

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Green spaces in cities help control floods, store carbon

A new study finds that urban green spaces like backyards, city parks and golf courses contribute substantially to the ecological fabric of our cities — and the wider landscape — and should be included in ecological data.

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In The Isthmus: Melting away: According to Science, we're losing something magical

When the lakes are frozen, Madison is a winter wonderland. But reliable ice and deep snow are becoming the anomaly. We’re losing something magical.

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In the New York Times: Climate change is altering lakes and streams, study suggests

“We’re monkeying with the very chemical foundation of these ecosystems,” said Emily H. Stanley, a limnologist (freshwater ecologist) at the University of Wisconsin — Madison. “But right now we don’t know enough yet to know where we’re going. To me, scientifically that’s really interesting, and as a human a little bit frightening.”

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In The Atlantic: America's rivers are getting saltier

“When we’re throwing down road salt, we might be thinking about the fact that we’re putting salt into the water, but we’re not thinking that it may also mobilize lead,” says Hilary Dugan, a limnologist at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Dugan has studied lakes in North America, which she also found to be increasing in salinity.

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Amid environmental change, lakes surprisingly static

In recent decades, change has defined our environment in the United States. Agriculture intensified. Urban areas sprawled. The climate warmed. Intense rainstorms became more common. But, says a new University of Wisconsin–Madison study, while those kinds of changes usually result in poor water quality, lakes have surprisingly stayed the same.

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Study shows many lakes getting murkier, but gives hope for improvement

A study of more than 5,000 Wisconsin lakes shows that nearly a quarter of them have become murkier in the past two decades. This trend could get worse as a changing climate leads to increased precipitation. However, the study also shows most lakes have stayed the same and some are even seeing an improvement in clarity.

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Zebra mussels invade Lake Mendota

Last fall, students in a UW-Madison undergraduate limnology lab found invasive zebra mussels living in Lake Mendota for the first time. Researchers monitoring for the invader continued to see the mussel only sporadically. Sometime in the last four months, however the team has started to find them congregating in large numbers all over Lake Mendota.

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Report reveals a big dependence on freshwater fish for global food security

Freshwater fish play a surprisingly crucial role in feeding some of the world’s most vulnerable people, according to a study published on October 24, 2016 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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