Professor Kathy Cramer in The Washington Post: Ready for an anti-Trump wave in November? Look at Wisconsin

Democrats won Wisconsin in every presidential election from 1988 to 2012, but Hillary Clinton’s strategists made the mistake of taking the state for granted in 2016. What they missed were trends brilliantly analyzed by Katherine J. Cramer, a political scientist at the University of Wisconsin, in her prophetic book, “The Politics of Resentment: Rural Consciousness in Wisconsin and the Rise of Scott Walker.” It was published eight months before the 2016 vote.

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Maria Cancian named the 2018 Galbraith Fellow

The American Academy of Political and Social Science this week named Maria Cancian its 2018 John Kenneth Galbraith Fellow. Cancian, a professor in the La Follette School of Public Affairs and the School of Social Work, as well as a faculty affiliate and former director of the Institute for Research on Poverty, is one of five scholars from across the country invited this year to join the AAPSS in recognition of their contributions to advancement of the social sciences.

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In the South China Morning Post: Healthy habits of mind bring happiness and can be learned – even by the busy

Richard J. Davidson, director of the UW-Madison Center for Healthy Minds, says research into how mental training like meditation affects our health throws light on what constitutes a healthy mind. Well-being – as understood by its qualities of awareness, connection, insight and purpose – is a skill that can be learned.

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Professor Katy Culver on WPR: What Logan Paul says about internet culture

YouTube star Logan Paul has been weathering a barrage of controversy following his video depicting an alleged suicide victim in Aokigahara, a forest in Japan. The video, coupled with others posted on his YouTube channel--highlights a growing concern over what is being produced on social media platforms. Wisconsin Public Radio speaks with Kathleen Culver, assistant professor and Director of UW-Madison’s Center for Journalism Ethics, about the news and what these videos say about internet culture. 

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Professor Susan Yackee on WPR: Federal rulemaking 101

Federal regulations affect everything from how much mercury dentists can pour down the sink to who’s allowed to drill on federal lands. There are thousands and thousands of regulations governing our lives, but since they’re not front and center in Congress, we rarely hear about them, even though regulations are really where the rubber hits the road. Wisconsin Public Radio talks to Susan Yackee, professor of public policy and political science at the UW-Madison La Folette School of Public Affairs, about the mysterious world of federal regulations. 

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In The Wisconsin State Journal: Dane County making progress in 'workforce,' affordable housing

“If you want to live somewhere and work somewhere, it’s difficult at existing wages,” said UW-Madison public affairs and economics professor Tim Smeeding, who studies income inequality. “The bottom end of the labor market has fallen out” and there’s been a “hollowing out of the middle class.”

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In the Cap Times: UW prof defends his study that found voter ID law deterred thousands from voting

University of Wisconsin-Madison political science professor Ken Mayer  released study results in September that estimated the Wisconsin voter ID law deterred 16,800 registered voters in Dane and Milwaukee counties from voting in the 2016 presidential election. Mayer said Sunday that some people didn’t vote because they didn’t realize they had valid IDs.

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In The New York Times: Can kindness be taught?

The Kindness Curriculum is part of a growing global movement to teach emotional intelligence in schools. Advocates of this approach say it’s shortsighted for teachers to focus narrowly on intellectual learning and ignore the cooperative emotional skills that enable learning — and learners — to flourish.

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Katy Culver in Snopes: Reading a story with unnamed sources

But two journalism experts we interviewed said if unnamed sources are used too frequently or unnecessarily, journalists risk losing the trust of audiences. Kathleen Culver, director of the Center for Journalism Ethics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison told us stories targeting President Donald Trump’s inner circle that deal in “palace intrigue” and utilize unnamed sources to tell lurid tales of strife within the White House may be wearing on readers’ credulity for such stories.

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