Byron Shafer quoted in The New York Times: Why is it so hard for democracy to deal with inequality?

Before reform, Byron Shafer, a political scientist at the University of Wisconsin, writes in Quiet Revolution: The Struggle for the Democratic Party and the Shaping of Post-Reform Politics, "there was an American party system in which one party, the Republicans, was primarily responsive to white collar constituencies, and in which the other, the Democrats, was primarily responsive to blue collar constituencies."

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Professor Karyn Riddle on WMTV: How to talk to children about school shootings

As adults we have a lot of questions after Wednesday's deadly school shooting in Florida, but children have their own concerns. Karyn Riddle is an associate professor at the UW School of Journalism and Mass Communications where her research focuses on the effects of exposure to media violence.

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Badger behind the Olympic scenes

A UW–Madison alumna Caitlin Furin is experiencing the Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea, up close. She's traveling with the U.S. Ski & Snowboard team as its communications and public relations manager

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In NPR: Professor Mark Seidenberg on the gap between the science on kids and reading, and how it is taught

Mark Seidenberg is not the first researcher to reach the stunning conclusion that only a third of the nation's schoolchildren read at grade level. The reasons are numerous, but one that Seidenberg cites over and over again is this: The way kids are taught to read in school is disconnected from the latest research, namely how language and speech actually develop in a child's brain.

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Paula Niedenthal in Quartz: The unique traits Americans developed from decades of immigration

Smiling, and showing emotions in general, is more common in countries that are historically diverse than in homogenous places, say researchers from Niedenthal Emotions Lab, at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Individuals in diverse societies have to rely on emotional expression to navigate the panoply of foreign cultures, social norms, and languages they came across during the course of everyday life.

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Lewis Friedland in The Chicago Tribune: Sinclair Broadcast Group solicits its news directors for its political fundraising efforts

Given that tradition, Sinclair’s policy "violates every standard of conduct that has existed in newsrooms for the past 40 or 50 years," said Lewis Friedland, a journalism professor at the University of Wisconsin and a former TV news producer. "I’ve never seen anything like this. They certainly have the right to do it, but it’s blatantly unethical."

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Holly Gibbs in Mongabay: Zero-deforestation pledges need help, support to meet targets, new study finds

“These companies stand poised to break the link between commodity production and deforestation,” co-author and environmental scientist Holly Gibbs of the University of Wisconsin-Madison said in a statement. “To do that, more immediate action is needed to demonstrate commitment to change and to clear the haze surrounding these efforts.”

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John Hawks in The Verge: Discovery of ancient stone tools rewrites the history of technology in India

A new discovery of stone tools from about 385,000 years ago has anthropologists rethinking the history of technology. The stone tools, found at a site in southern India, were sophisticated blades chipped from chunks of quartz, which is a technique that experts previously thought came to India only about 125,000 years ago.

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UW–Madison alumna third Badger to win prestigious new international scholarship

Fangdi Pan (B.A.'13, Economics and International Studies) is one of 142 students in the just-announced third class of Schwarzman Scholars. Winners receive full tuition for a one-year master’s degree program at Tsinghua University in Beijing.

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