Research to relieve stress of police officers expands

The Madison Police Department teamed up with UW–Madison's Center for Healthy Minds for a pilot study exploring a mindfulness-based program with officers and is partnering again with the UW alongside UWPD and the Dane County Sheriff's Office to expand the research and understand ways to improve the well-being of law enforcement professionals

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Icebound detector reveals how ghostly neutrinos are stopped cold

Famously, neutrinos, the nearly massless particles that are a fundamental component of the universe, can zip through a million miles of lead without skipping a beat. Now, in a critical measurement that may one day help predict new physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics, an international team of researchers with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory has shown how energized neutrinos can be stopped cold as they pass through the Earth.

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Images of strange solar system visitor peel away some of the mystery

A strange visitor, either asteroid or comet, zipping through our solar system at a high rate of speed is giving astronomers a once-in-a-generation opportunity to examine up close an object from somewhere else in our galaxy.

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Molecular magnetism packs power with "messenger electron"

Electrons can be a persuasive bunch, or at least, a talkative bunch, according to new work from John Berry's lab at UW-Madison. The spins of unpaired electrons are the root of permanent magnetism, and after 10 years of design and re-design, Berry's lab has made a molecule that gains magnetic strength through an unusual way of controlling those spins. 

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In Nature: Four ethical priorities for neurotechnologies and AI

Information School Associate Professor Alan Rubel contributes to an article in Nature examining how artificial intelligence and brain–computer interfaces must respect and preserve users' privacy, identity, agency and equality.

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Cool idea: Magma held in ‘cold storage’ before giant volcano eruption

Here’s a rule of geoscience: The past heralds the future. So it’s not just morbid curiosity that attracts geoscientists to places like Long Valley, California, where a super-eruption occured 765,000 years ago. It’s an ardent desire to understand why super-eruptions happen, ultimately to understand where and when they are likely to occur again.

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In New York Magazine: Can Call of Duty make you an NBA star?

Shawn Green, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, believes that games like Call of Duty develop retained skills specifically because they are fun. Games created with the sole intent to improve cognition are what he referred to at a panel at the University of California, San Francisco, as “chocolate-covered broccoli.”

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All hands on deck to understand, predict, prevent abrupt ecological change

In 2011, Lake Erie turned into a toxic pea soup. One-sixth of the lake harbored a thick and deadly algal bloom that killed fish, closed beaches and struck a blow to Toledo, Ohio’s tourism industry. The bloom was three times larger than any algal bloom ever recorded there. The contamination was forecast by ecologists in 2011, said Stephen Carpenter, newly retired as director of the Center for Limnology, at a recent campus symposium centered around a new effort to understand, predict and prevent these kinds of abrupt ecological changes.

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Tropical trees show coexistence is path to diversity

Tropical forests boast a diversity of tree species — Barro Colorado Island, for example, has roughly as many tree species as all of Europe ­— and as part of his Ph.D. research, Jacob Usinowicz wanted to understand why and how they all manage to coexist. 

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