In Channel 3000: A state where every child thrives

Living in poverty, underemployed, enduring food insecurity, the effects of crime and abuse, and more is physically and emotionally unhealthy and dangerous. A new UW-Madison study underscores that theory.

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Gambling against the odds on life’s risks more common after childhood stress

Adults who lived high-stress childhoods have trouble reading the signs that a loss or punishment is looming, leaving themselves in situations that risk avoidable health and financial problems and legal trouble. According to researchers at UW-Madison, this difficulty may be biological, stemming from an unhelpful lack of activity in the brain when a situation should be prompting heightened awareness. 

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In Fueling Discovery: Working to understand cultures as relationships

Professor Tom DuBois from the Department of German, Nordic and Scandinavian Studies writes about his work studying the folklore of American and Scandinavian cultures. 

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Research to relieve stress of police officers expands

The Madison Police Department teamed up with UW–Madison's Center for Healthy Minds for a pilot study exploring a mindfulness-based program with officers and is partnering again with the UW alongside UWPD and the Dane County Sheriff's Office to expand the research and understand ways to improve the well-being of law enforcement professionals

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Icebound detector reveals how ghostly neutrinos are stopped cold

Famously, neutrinos, the nearly massless particles that are a fundamental component of the universe, can zip through a million miles of lead without skipping a beat. Now, in a critical measurement that may one day help predict new physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics, an international team of researchers with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory has shown how energized neutrinos can be stopped cold as they pass through the Earth.

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Images of strange solar system visitor peel away some of the mystery

A strange visitor, either asteroid or comet, zipping through our solar system at a high rate of speed is giving astronomers a once-in-a-generation opportunity to examine up close an object from somewhere else in our galaxy.

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Molecular magnetism packs power with "messenger electron"

Electrons can be a persuasive bunch, or at least, a talkative bunch, according to new work from John Berry's lab at UW-Madison. The spins of unpaired electrons are the root of permanent magnetism, and after 10 years of design and re-design, Berry's lab has made a molecule that gains magnetic strength through an unusual way of controlling those spins. 

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In Nature: Four ethical priorities for neurotechnologies and AI

Information School Associate Professor Alan Rubel contributes to an article in Nature examining how artificial intelligence and brain–computer interfaces must respect and preserve users' privacy, identity, agency and equality.

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Cool idea: Magma held in ‘cold storage’ before giant volcano eruption

Here’s a rule of geoscience: The past heralds the future. So it’s not just morbid curiosity that attracts geoscientists to places like Long Valley, California, where a super-eruption occured 765,000 years ago. It’s an ardent desire to understand why super-eruptions happen, ultimately to understand where and when they are likely to occur again.

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