“Ring around bathtub” at giant volcano field shows movement of subterranean magma

The Laguna del Maule volcanic complex in Chile is a large, complicated and explosive landscape that, oddly, lacks the classic cone seen on many volcanoes, including Fuego, the Guatemalan volcano that killed hundreds in a June 3 eruption.

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Muir Woods research works to understand how plants have sex

Sain is studying how — and why — different plants have sex. Her main research subject is the ubiquitous early meadow-rue, a low-lying perennial plant found across the eastern half of the United States.

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Study finds “hidden harvest” in world’s inland fisheries

A new study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences says we are dramatically underestimating the role inland fisheries play in global food security.

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Heavier rains and manure mean more algae blooms

On June 6, 2018, the Center for Limnology reported that a toxic algae bloom had begun to spread across Lake Mendota. It quickly led to the closure of beaches around Madison’s largest lake.

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Institute for Research on Poverty in Journal Sentinel: "Study: In 2016, Wisconsin's job market improved but the state's poverty rate increased"

Despite a robust job market, Wisconsin’s poverty rate increased to 10.8% in 2016, compared to 9.7% in 2015, according to a report released Friday by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

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Thank the moon for Earth’s lengthening day

A new study that reconstructs the deep history of our planet’s relationship to the moon shows that 1.4 billion years ago, a day on Earth lasted just over 18 hours.

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Training compassion ‘muscle’ may boost brain’s resilience to others’ suffering

A new study suggests that compassion meditation training may reduce the distress a person feels when witnessing another’s suffering. It may also improve their ability and likelihood to respond with compassion.

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Ultralight science: Boundary layer measurements from low-flying source

A professor is using an ultralight aircraft to conduct a research project aimed at better understanding the Earth’s atmosphere. Instruments strapped to the wings and the cockpit of the aircraft collect atmospheric data while it is airborne.

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Homo naledi had a tiny brain but it looked a lot like ours

Scientists and nonscientists alike have often associated larger brains with greater intelligence, but a new study may challenge that notion. “Maybe brain size isn’t all it’s cracked up to be,” says John Hawks, one of the study’s corresponding authors.

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