Magnetic fields in distant galaxy are new piece of cosmic puzzle

Astronomers have measured magnetic fields in a galaxy 4.6 billion light-years away — a big clue to understanding how magnetic fields formed and evolved over cosmic time.

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Coral skeletons may resist the effects of acidifying oceans

New research from Pupa Gilbert provides evidence that at least one species of coral, Stylophora pistillata, and possibly others, build their hard, calcium carbonate skeletons faster, and in bigger pieces, than previously thought.

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Amid environmental change, lakes surprisingly static

In recent decades, change has defined our environment in the United States. Agriculture intensified. Urban areas sprawled. The climate warmed. Intense rainstorms became more common. But, says a new University of Wisconsin–Madison study, while those kinds of changes usually result in poor water quality, lakes have surprisingly stayed the same.

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In The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Types of smiles send different messages in social situations

Due to their surprisingly complicated nature, scientists have long struggled to classify smiles, but a study published last week by the University of Wisconsin-Madison and collaborators has now categorized them into three groups. 

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Pregnancy loss and evolution of sex linked by cellular line dance

A researcher reports that meiosis takes a heavy toll on the viability of offspring — and not just for humans. Many creatures pay a price to undergo sexual reproduction.

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Undocumented immigration doesn’t worsen drug, alcohol problems in U.S., study indicates

An increase in the proportion of the population that is undocumented is associated with fewer drug arrests, drunken driving arrests and drug overdoses.

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Podcast project receives NEH grant

Communication Arts assistant professors Jeremy Morris and Eric Hoyt are investigating the golden age of podcasting to make digital audio more usable for scholars and the public.

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Researchers crack the smile, describing 3 types by muscle movement

The smile may be the most common and flexible expression, used to reveal some emotions, cover others and manage social interactions that have kept communities secure and organized for millennia. But how do we tell one kind of smile from another?

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UW helps create the largest neutrino detectors in the world

A new era in neutrino physics in the United States is underway, and UW–Madison’s Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL) in Stoughton is playing a key role.

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