Pregnancy loss and evolution of sex linked by cellular line dance

A researcher reports that meiosis takes a heavy toll on the viability of offspring — and not just for humans. Many creatures pay a price to undergo sexual reproduction.

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How to take in the solar eclipse: Tips from UW Space Place

On Monday, Aug. 21, for the first time in almost 100 years, a total solar eclipse will sweep across the United States from coast to coast, bathing the country in the moon’s shadow and providing a unique view of the sun — as long as the clouds stay away. The effects of the partial eclipse in Wisconsin will be subtle, but worth watching nonetheless. 

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UW helps create the largest neutrino detectors in the world

A new era in neutrino physics in the United States is underway, and UW–Madison’s Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL) in Stoughton is playing a key role.

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In words and glass, collaboration unlocks birth of modern chemistry

In an interdisciplinary collaboration, historian of science Catherine Jackson and scientific glassblower Tracy Drier are delving into the foundations of modern chemistry and its reliance on specialized glassware. Through historical research and the re-creation of iconic glass apparatus, Jackson and Drier aim to uncover the beginnings of Drier’s profession and its contribution to the field of chemistry as it matured in the 19th century.

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In On Wisconsin Magazine: Where there's a Will...

Patricia Bean McConnell (B.S.’81, M.S.’84, PhD’88, Zoology) of Black Earth, Wisconsin, is an internationally renowned zoologist and certified applied animal behaviorist who specializes in canine aggression. 

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Longtime botany greenhouse director Mo Fayyaz to retire

When the Iranian government offered Mo Fayyaz a full scholarship to study horticulture abroad, a simple oversight meant the University of Wisconsin–Madison was not his top choice. “I didn’t even know there was a state called Wisconsin,” laughs Fayyaz, who is retiring in August after 33 years as the distinguished director of the botany department greenhouse and botanical gardens.

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Peanut family secret for making chemical building blocks revealed

As you bite into your next peanut butter and jelly sandwich, chew on this: The peanut you’re eating has a secret. It’s a subtle one. The peanut and its kin — legumes — have not one, but two ways to make the amino acid tyrosine, one of the 20 required to make all of its proteins, and an essential human nutrient.

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UW–Madison chemist named American Chemical Society fellow

University of Wisconsin–Madison chemistry Professor Ned Sibert is one of 65 newly selected American Chemical Society fellows. The fellows program honors scientists who have made important contributions to the chemical sciences.

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On Wisconsin Public Radio: UW-Madison scientist explains Antarctica's massive new iceberg

A chunk of ice the size of Delaware broke off from the Antarctic Peninsula this week. Associate Scientist and Research Meteorologist Matthew Lazzara why this happened and what it means for climate change around the world and close to home in Wisconsin.

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