Ghosts in the Genome: John Hawks reviews "Who We Are and How We Got Here" for the Wall Street Journal

Some 4,500 years ago, the Bell Beakers invaded Britain. Roughly 90% of the genes of later Britons came from this group, named for the distinctive shape of their pottery. Archaeologists long thought that Britain’s early farmers, who built Stonehenge five millennia ago, adopted the pots from continental neighbors. Instead DNA evidence shows that the farmers were nearly annihilated by the Bell Beakers.

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David Canon Q&A in the Cap Times: UW-Madison professor David Canon explains what a Wisconsin #bluewave could look like

Last week's election results for the state Supreme Court, in which Milwaukee County Judge Rebecca Dallet, who was backed by Democrats, handily beat Sauk County Judge Michael Screnock, who was supported by Republicans, led to a deluge of analysis about what it means for the fall general election and whether a #bluewave, as Gov. Scott Walker tweeted last week, really is on the horizon. 

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Sociology alumnus Matthew Desmond in the New York Times: In 83 million eviction records, a sweeping and intimate new look at housing in America

This courthouse handles every eviction in Richmond, a city with one of the highest eviction rates in the country, according to new data covering dozens of states and compiled by a team led by the Princeton sociologist Matthew Desmond. Two years ago, Mr. Desmond turned eviction into a national topic of conversation with “Evicted,” a book that chronicled how poor families who lost their homes in Milwaukee sank ever deeper into poverty.

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Barry Burden in the Washington Post: The record number of women running in Democratic primaries will likely outperform their Republican peers

The number of women running for the Senate isn’t a record; that was set in 2016 at 40. Nonetheless, 13 Republican women and 17 Democratic women have declared their candidacies. These tallies are particularly interesting given research released this week by Barry Burden of the University of Wisconsin in Madison and Yoshikuni Ono of Tohoku University in Japan.

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In the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: $220 million building boom on UW-Madison campus will modernize chemistry and agriculture facilities

The longtime space crunch for students taking chemistry classes will finally begin to ease in a couple of years, the famous but antiquated Babcock Dairy Hall is getting a big addition and the meat science program will soon get a new building on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus.

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In the Wall Street Journal: Smiles hide many messages, some of them unfriendly

“Different smiles have different impacts on people’s bodies,” said Jared D. Martin, a doctoral student who led the study in the lab of University of Wisconsin–Madison psychology professor Paula Niedenthal. Along with poker players, psychologists have long known that our facial expressions can betray our emotions. But no one has demonstrated exactly how this works, Mr. Martin said.

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Ryan Owens quoted in the New York Times: Wisconsin Supreme Court election latest victory for women

In January, Dallet and her 16-year-old daughter participated in the women's march in Milwaukee, joining with thousands of other women across the state and country demanding to be heard. "Strategically, politically, it was really, really effective," said Ryan Owens, a law professor at the University of Wisconsin who heads the Tommy G. Thompson Center on Public Leadership.

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In the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: 5 things to know about food delivery app EatStreet as its rapid national growth continues

The Madison-based food ordering and delivery app EatStreet is one of the recent success stories in the Wisconsin startup scene. The company founded in a dorm room at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2010 has become a real player in the online food ordering business across the United States. EatStreet connects diners in more than 250 cities to more than 15,000 restaurants. 

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Lewis Friedland on NBC Nightly News: TV anchors decrying ‘fake’ news puts spotlight on Sinclair Broadcast Group

The country’s largest local broadcast group is under fire for requiring local news anchors in dozens of markets to read an identical promo ad script, criticizing “false news” and “fake stories.”

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