In the New York Times: Some see bitter Wisconsin race as next midterm barometer

While there's no doubt that Democrats this year are more energized than Republicans, it's dubious whether one election can be an accurate bellwether of what's to come in November, said Ryan Owens, a law professor at the University of Wisconsin who heads the Tommy G. Thompson Center on Public Leadership.

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In Cosmos: Leg genes give spiders segmented heads

The segmented heads of spiders and scorpions arise from the actions of a gene that in other arthropod species is responsible for creating legs. That’s the somewhat surprising finding made by two scientists, Emily Setton and Prashant Sharma from the University of Wisconsin-Madison during an investigation into the evolutionary origin of spider silk-spinning.

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Patrick Iber in Forbes: Mexico's 2018 election: Populism vs. prudence

The 2018 election in Mexico will have a big impact, not just for Mexico but also for multinational companies that operate in Mexico and north of the border in the US.

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Quoted in Quartz: Postdoctoral fellow Lisa Rand on China's first space lab

“When an object is uncontrolled, and its orbit is decaying, it starts tumbling,” Lisa Rand, a space junk scholar and a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Wisconsin’s Madison campus, told Quartz. The lab is subject to friction and pressure in the earth’s upper atmosphere and it will start to break apart, according to Rand.

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Pam Oliver quoted in the Wall Street Journal: After the ‘March for Our Lives,’ student activists focus on midterm elections

Quoted: Pamela Oliver, a University of Wisconsin sociology professor, said to build a sustained movement after the midterm elections, students have to persuade supporters to persevere through legislative losses and fading media attention. “At some point, you’re going to face setbacks, and you have to be willing to endure when you’re not winning. You have to settle in for the longer haul.”

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Jonathan Gray in The Observer: How John Oliver changed news

You may not think millennials have the attention span for 20-minute explainers on Bitcoin, Italian politics or the Confederacy. But such is the power of bespectacled British comedian John Oliver and his HBO show Last Week Tonight: audiences now care about and pay attention to these types of issues.

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Chris Wells quoted on KVUE.com: Russian Twitter trolls stoked racial tension in wake of Milwaukee rioting before 2016 election

A team that included University of Wisconsin-Madison Associate Professor of Journalism Chris Wells found last month that at least 116 articles from U.S. media outlets included tweets from @TEN_GOP and other Russian-linked accounts, with the tweets usually cited as examples of supposedly ordinary Americans voicing their views. Wells said that the tweets found by the Journal Sentinel seemed similar.

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Sebastian Heinz on WPR: Groundbreaking physicist Stephen Hawking dies at 76

Theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking died early Wednesday morning at the age of 76. Hawking was best known for his theories of black holes and became a household name following the publication of his book, A Brief History of Time in 1988. WPR speaks with Sebastian Heinz, Professor of Astronomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, about the life and legacy of Stephen Hawking.  

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Barry Burden quoted in Newsweek: The alt-right's first real political candidate went too far, even for white nationalists

“He went from being kind of an underground hero in 2016 to being a total pariah,” Barry Burden, a professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, told Newsweek. “They’ve all walked away from him now. No one in the conservative movement is willing to stand with him.”

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