Two L&S professors named AAAS Fellows

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) has elected five professors from the University of Wisconsin-Madison as AAAS Fellows. Two of the new inductees - Professor of Astronomy Amy Barger and Professor of Chemistry John Berry - are from L&S. 

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UW researchers discover an evolutionary stepping stone to beet-red beets

Writing this week (Oct. 9, 2017) in the journal New Phytologist, University of Wisconsin–Madison Professor of Botany Hiroshi Maeda and his colleagues describe an ancient loosening up of a key biochemical pathway that set the stage for the ancestors of beets to develop their characteristic red pigment.

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UW awarded $12.5 million to study astrophysical plasma here on Earth

The U.S. Department of Energy has awarded $12.5 million to the University of Wisconsin–Madison to develop an integrated facility that will expand the frontier of astrophysical plasma research. Combining and extending two existing projects, the Big Red Plasma Ball and the Madison Symmetric Torus, the new Wisconsin Plasma Physics Laboratory, or WiPPL, will research fundamental properties of plasma in order to better understand our universe, where the hot gas is abundant.

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In On Wisconsin Magazine: The Physics Museum

“I was always a tinkerer,” Steve Narf explains from his Chamberlin Hall workshop lined with towering cabinets, each one stuffed with an amazing array of tools, bolts, and wires. It seems fitting, then, that the Madison native returned to his hometown 22 years ago from the Twin Cities to manage the L. R. Ingersoll Physics Museum. 

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Campus museums recreate ‘cabinet of natural history’ digitally

A new UW2020 initiative will centralize the databases of the university’s five natural history museums, which have separated over the decades to specialize and accommodate growing collections. The 1.3-million-specimen Wisconsin State Herbarium will coordinate with the zoology, geology, entomology and anthropology museums to merge records in a way that allows researchers to study the full scope of natural artifacts in one central location. 

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Coral skeletons may resist the effects of acidifying oceans

New research from Pupa Gilbert provides evidence that at least one species of coral, Stylophora pistillata, and possibly others, build their hard, calcium carbonate skeletons faster, and in bigger pieces, than previously thought.

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Course explores new field at intersection of genomics and society

At a time when sequencing your genes is as simple as spitting in a cup, Jason Fletcher wants to understand how this new trove of data impacts society by helping to build a new field of study: social genomics.

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Pregnancy loss and evolution of sex linked by cellular line dance

A researcher reports that meiosis takes a heavy toll on the viability of offspring — and not just for humans. Many creatures pay a price to undergo sexual reproduction.

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How to take in the solar eclipse: Tips from UW Space Place

On Monday, Aug. 21, for the first time in almost 100 years, a total solar eclipse will sweep across the United States from coast to coast, bathing the country in the moon’s shadow and providing a unique view of the sun — as long as the clouds stay away. The effects of the partial eclipse in Wisconsin will be subtle, but worth watching nonetheless. 

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